Living History Reenactors

History[ edit ] Despite the act’s official title dating it to , its origins can be traced as far back as the Civil War when the United States Congress passed a total moratorium on civil actions brought against Union soldiers and sailors. Examples of civil matters included breach of contract , bankruptcy , foreclosure or divorce proceedings. Congress’ intent in passing the moratorium was to protect both national interests and those of servicemembers. First, Congress wanted servicemembers to be able to fight the war without having to worry about problems that might arise at home. Secondly, because most soldiers and sailors during the Civil War were not well paid, it was difficult for them to honor their pre-service debts, such as mortgage payments or other credit. Congressional concern about protecting the rights of servicemembers was raised again during World War I when the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of was passed. Like the Civil War-era moratorium, the legislation was designed to protect the rights of service members while they were serving in the war. Although the Act did not include a total moratorium on civil actions, it did protect service members from such things as repossession of property, bankruptcy, foreclosure or other such actions while they were in harm’s way. The present-day statute, essentially a reenactment of the law, was passed in to protect the rights of the millions of service members activated for World War II. The major difference between it and the version, other than minor modifications, was there was no provision for the act to expire, as it did after World War I.

Ask A Reenactor: Ethnicity & Reenacting

Some things bother me more than others, and though I am far from perfect myself and indeed have been guilty of some of my own complaints in the past , I feel that the hobby as a whole would be greatly improved with a few changes. These are non-period-specific, and some apply more in some eras than others. Washing your clothes so damn much!

Letting your clothes show wear. If you must wash your reenacting clothes, wash them by hand in a sink or bathtub and hang dry them. I have a confession to make:

Patriot games: Inside the weird and wonderful world of civil war reenactment. The Battle of Gettysburg is reenacted each year in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to mark the anniversary of the American.

History[ edit ] Despite the act’s official title dating it to , its origins can be traced as far back as the Civil War when the United States Congress passed a total moratorium on civil actions brought against Union soldiers and sailors. In basic terms, this meant that any legal action involving a civil matter was put on hold until after the soldier or sailor returned from the war.

Examples of civil matters included breach of contract , bankruptcy , foreclosure or divorce proceedings. Congress’ intent in passing the moratorium was to protect both national interests and those of servicemembers. First, Congress wanted servicemembers to be able to fight the war without having to worry about problems that might arise at home. Secondly, because most soldiers and sailors during the Civil War were not well paid, it was difficult for them to honor their pre-service debts, such as mortgage payments or other credit.

Congressional concern about protecting the rights of servicemembers was raised again during World War I when the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of was passed.

The Lady Civil War Reenactor: Part III

The first would be like catching your boyfriend in his boxers pop-lockin’ to the movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo — aka, “Ah-ha, so you are a dork! That would be the “Ah-ha, so you’re a dick! But what if your ah ha moment was something completely different?

The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (formerly called the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act) (codified at 50 U.S.C. §§ —) is a United States federal law that protects soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines, coast guardsmen, commissioned officers in the Public Health Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, from being sued while in active military service of.

As the war progressed, however, this changed quickly. Instead of new clothing, parents had to mend old clothes and there was much reliance on hand-me-downs. Despite this, there were strong attempts made by parents to keep their children looking as well-dressed as possible. Both sides were united in wanting to preserve children’s innocence and show that they were not to be easily beaten.

Boys’ Clothing In the 19th century, boys wore dresses for the first five years of their lives – something that had been done for centuries. Then they were “breeched,” meaning they gave up dresses and started wearing breeches, marking their entry into a man’s world. The s saw the beginning of knickerbockers as boys’ wear. These were wide-leg trousers that buttoned at the knee and came with a matching waistcoat and jacket. Boys wore white shirts and bow ties.

Leg wear was long stockings and low-cut boots. Essentially, boys dressed to look like their fathers with the difference being that their jackets and trousers were shorter. They might also wear a cap, rather than a hat. Girls’ Clothing On the face of it, Civil War clothing for girls looked very like what their mothers were wearing.

List of historical reenactment events

Steel stirrup hangers, correct steel rings and staples, covered with new rawhide. Our stirrups are bent by hand and correctly shaped. The center spreader is held in place by two rivets, as were the originals. New brass plates, Civil War type shield and correct iron Civil War hardware used throughout. Only the best harness leather is used. Comes complete with coat straps and English indigo blue wool girth; ready to go.

Bales: Fixed: July: Sept: Swivel/Flexible: Oct: End: Rim Butt: Front: July: Oct: Rear.

Comes with a signed COA and an informational trifold flyer. We use PayPal for secure online payment. To order by phone call – , and tell them you want the Witness Trees of Christ Lutheran bookmark. Or email us regarding items and payment options – Witness Tree Keyring. Neither General Meade, the Union commander, nor the South’s General Lee wished to fight at Gettysburg, but on the mourning of July 1, , Union cavalry General John Buford made a decision that set in motion a battle that would last for 3 days.

Statement of authentication on aged parchment paper.

TRES PINOS CIVIL WAR DAYS

Overview[ edit ] Diagram of the Spencer rifle showing the magazine in the butt The design for a magazine-fed, lever-operated rifle chambered for the. Called the Spencer Repeating Rifle, it was fired by cocking a lever to extract a used case and feed a new cartridge from a tube in the buttstock. Like most firearms of the time, the hammer had to be manually cocked after each round in a separate action before the weapon could be fired.

A spring in the tube enabled the rounds to be fired one after another.

Union & Confederate Civil War Clothing, Uniforms, Memorabilia, & Gear. Find reproduction Union & Confederate Civil War reenactment clothing, uniforms, gear and more at Military Uniform Supply, Inc. Relive the era with reenactment Civil War clothing and vintage Civil War uniform accessories. Collectors will appreciate an assortment of Civil War memorabilia items, including brass.

This style was often seen in CS camps. Stands to reason that some were torn apart for plates just as the style were for bowls don’t you think. Makes a great small plate. Tin lined copper cups. Heavy gauge copper with a high quality, heavy yet smooth tin coating that will last a lifetime. It holds over 3 cups! This one is 8 inches wide with the total length, handle and all, 15 inches. It’s heavy enough for years and years of good service yet light enough to carry on campaign.

American Civil War reenactment

Here are the questions: It seems like most reenactors deal with European or American events where people of color are rarely, if ever, involved. I realize this is a really complicated issue, but any thoughts you have would be much appreciated! Because most events focus on white history.

National Park Service Civil War soldiers and sailors database Photo of Confederate Private Edwin Jemison. Find this Pin and more on History/ reenactments by Sha Wheeler. The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System (CWSS) is a database containing information about the men who served in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War.

The two have formed a re-enactment unit based on a company that included 25 soldiers from the Hudson area who saw action in the War Between the States. The 22nd Wisconsin was organized in Racine and mustered into federal service on Sept. It earned the nickname “The Abolitionist Regiment” during a march through Kentucky and Tennessee, prior to its first action in the war. The regiment was known for taking in runaway slaves and protecting them from the slave owners who came looking for them.

The 22nd Wisconsin’s record in battle is spotty. Half the regiment was captured in its first battle at Brentwood, Tenn. A week or two later, the other half was captured, and they were all marched off to the Confederacy’s Libby Prison in Richmond, Va.

Gettysburg 150th – Pickett’s Charge (Civil War Reenactment)


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